A Complete List of Degree Types for College and University

A technical communication curriculum includes training in writing, editing, multimedia technology, and documentation design. Technical communication programs can teach you how to distill complex technical information into readable, engaging content. Some programs may let you specialize in writing for a specific industry, such as software development or healthcare.

What Degree Do You Need To Be A Teacher?

If you’re looking to have a great impact on the lives of many students, then you may be considering becoming a teacher. At the start of your journey, you’ll likely find yourself asking, “What degree do you need to be a teacher?”

We’re here to share everything you need to know about becoming a teacher. We’ll answer questions like, “How long does it take to become a teacher?” as well as share the steps you can follow to land your first position as a teacher.

HND / Foundation Degree

What is a foundation degree?

Higher level degrees (level-5 work-based courses) are taught in the UK and are equivalent to two years at a college or obtaining A-levels, to set you on track for a Bachelor’s degree. If continuing your education to a more thorough course is not for you, there’s no need to fret; a foundation degree can lead straight into full-time employment.

How long does it last?

What are the entry requirements?

To qualify for a HND/ foundation degree, you’ll need a minimum of 100 UCAS points. You can gain these through a number of qualifications that are studied at high-school from A-levels, IELTS, VCE, a BTEC or a diploma. Each course may have varied necessities, so do check well-before the application process to ensure you have what is needed.

Four-year colleges and universities

You’ll likely refer to your student entering either a college or a university program as a “college student” and share the news with family and friends as, “my daughter is going to college.” This is a normal way to refer to this stage of life. Colleges and universities are often talked about interchangeably, and while they are very similar educational institutions, there are a few key differences.

A college is a post-secondary institution that usually provides only undergraduate education, as opposed to offering graduate programs as well. This is not always the case, however this is the typical distinction from a university. Colleges also tend to be smaller than universities and have smaller class sizes. Depending on your student, smaller class sizes may be a good reason to choose a college over a university, as they can provide more personal learning opportunities. Each individual college will vary depending on type and region, so additional research is necessary to find the best fit for your teen.

Universities are post-secondary institutions that provide undergraduate and graduate programs. They will often have medical or law schools as well. Universities tend to be bigger than colleges, with more diverse curriculum because of the larger student body. Usually, universities divide up their different programs into schools like the “College of Engineering” or the “College of Education,” through which specific programs can be completed. Universities will often dedicate quite a bit of time and resources to research. Professors at universities typically are conducting this research while also teaching classes. It is common to have a TA (teaching assistant), who is also a graduate student, teaching smaller, discussion-based classes, while the professor teaches several large lectures during the week.

Most states have what are known as “flagship” universities. This refers to the main public college in the state, which is likely quite large (i.e. University of Wisconsin-Madison, Ohio State University, University of Texas, etc.). These universities typically draw students from both in-state and out-of-state, and often internationally as well. States will also have smaller public schools, usually drawing the majority of the student body from the region. In-state versus out-of-state universities (and colleges) can be a big financial determinant for where your teen goes to school, as state schools tend to be less expensive for students who are currently residents of that state.

Think About Life After a Bachelor’s Degree in Psychology

High school is also a good time to begin planning for life after your undergraduate studies, whether that includes graduate school or taking using your understanding of psychology to work in a different field.

Earning your bachelor’s degree is undoubtedly a big achievement, but it is also one milestone along the path to a more distant destination: your career. For psychology majors, in particular, it’s important to begin thinking about your future beyond the bachelor’s degree as early as possible.

Many undergraduate psychology majors don’t go on to work in the field of psychology, according to the American Psychological Association. Instead, they use the skills they developed by studying psychology – including skills in research, writing, analyzing data and solving problems – in occupations in fields like education, business, sales, health and biological sciences, public affairs and administrative support.

If you want to become a psychologist, you will need to go to graduate school. A doctoral degree, such as a Ph.D. in psychology or a Doctor of Psychology (Psy.D.), is the typical education required for clinical, research and counseling psychologists, according to the United States Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS). You can also use an undergraduate background in psychology to earn a master’s degree in counseling, marriage and family therapy, school psychology or industrial-organizational psychology.

Psychology jobs without a graduate degree may include research lab manager, behavioral health technician, research assistant, research analyst and research coordinator.

Frequently Asked Questions About Studying Online

1. How long does it take to complete a degree online?

Just like with on-campus programs, it takes about four years to get an online degree at the bachelor’s level, and another two years at the master’s level. Or, if you don’t mind a less advanced credential, you can earn an associate degree in only about two years. Some accelerated programs let you finish sooner. The amount of time it takes will depend on whether you study full-time or part-time and if you already completed any other post-secondary training. In some cases, if you previously attended school on campus, you can finish your degree online.

2. Are online degrees easier to get?

Online classes are easier in the sense that you have the flexibility to schedule them around your other commitments. Many courses offer recorded lectures and let you access course materials when it is convenient for you instead of being tied to a fixed timetable. Plus, online courses often feature multiple start dates, so you may not have to wait long before beginning your training.

However, the best online classes demand that students meet the same requirements and learn the same material as on-campus students. So in that sense, it isn’t any easier to get a degree online than to get one the traditional way. Online college is not harder, but it is different: You must be self-directed and disciplined to succeed.

3. How do employers view online degrees?

Online education has become so common that many employers accept online degrees without batting an eye. Most hiring managers are more concerned about what you studied and whether you attended a reputable school than how you earned your credentials.

Plenty of well-regarded colleges, such as Harvard and Columbia, offer online degrees. But you don’t need an Ivy League name on your transcript to be a credible job candidate. As long as you receive your degree from an accredited school, potential employers will take you seriously. (Plus, in many cases, there’s nothing to indicate that your degree was obtained online, so employers may not even be able to tell.)

References:

https://www.uopeople.edu/blog/what-degree-do-you-need-to-be-a-teacher/
https://www.careeraddict.com/degree-types
https://www.today.com/parenting-guides/guide-continuing-education-after-high-school-t179309
https://www.degreequery.com/how-do-i-prepare-for-a-psychology-degree-while-in-high-school/
https://www.trade-schools.net/articles/highest-paying-online-degrees